Does EMS Technology Really Work?

Does EMS Technology Really Work?

Keeping New Year’s Fitness Resolutions is Easy with the Pulse Performance 20-minute EMS Workout

Like every new year, 2023 will bring resolutions for better health and fitness. But we all know that most New Year’s resolutions fail. Many of us start out strong in January with frequent trips to the gym, but then there’s the inevitable fallout. But it doesn’t have to be that way, says Tammy Busch, president of Pulse Performance, an innovative fitness franchise that delivers an effective workout using Electrical Muscle Stimulation (EMS) technology. “At Pulse Performance, we customize and personalize training sessions so members can reach fitness goals (no matter what they are) and do the things they love,” she says. “The best part is that you can see results from doing 20-minute sessions one to two times per week.”  

EMS workouts are for just about anyone who wants to improve their fitness: from elite athletes who want to build endurance to people who have suffered from an injury or are dealing with chronic pain. EMS low-impact training has been proven safe and beneficial as rehab workouts and workouts for seniors.

EMS technology has been a game changer for Pulse Performance member Jessica Leirer. She joined the Austin-based studio after seeing her friend get amazing results. “A friend who was in a catastrophic car accident used EMS as part of his physical therapy and recovery post-surgery. I was really impressed at how much it helped him,” she says. So Leirer decided to research EMS for her own strength-training needs. “My doctor told me I needed to start adding muscle mass.” Leirer loves the fun atmosphere and the fact that everything is customized to skill level. “It’s a great solution for people who don’t like spending hours at the gym,” she says. “It has helped me build muscle in harder-to-work areas and to stay motivated to keep up with workouts since they are only twice a week and 20 minutes.”

EMS workouts are for just about anyone who wants to improve their fitness: from elite athletes who want to build endurance to people who have suffered from an injury or are dealing with chronic pain.

Retired banker Patty Wright is also a member of the Austin Pulse Performance studio and says that EMS technology has been working for her. “This program has improved my muscle strength, specifically in my back and legs,” she says. “Quite frankly, I don’t like to exercise. So when I heard it was only 20 minutes per session, it piqued my interest.” Wright finds the program fun, effective and satisfying. “I really like the trainers and all the folks who work at Pulse Performance. They are very friendly and more like family.”

How do you Keep New Year’s Fitness Resolutions?

Busch says the trick to keeping New Year’s fitness resolutions is being realistic. “Think about the life you want to have and how getting healthier and more fit will get you there. From chasing your grandkids around to golfing to doing weekend fitness competitions, being fit makes a huge difference and everyone’s fitness goals are different,” she says.

Engagement is the secret sauce at Pulse Performance. Trainers employ different ways to keep members interested so they look forward to returning. And it’s not just to fulfill New Year’s fitness resolutions but to live a better life. “We help our members stay engaged in several ways. Our personalized training sessions ensure members are working at their fitness level to reach goals,” With several services (EMS Fitness, EMS Sculpt and Infrared therapy), members get a comprehensive fitness routine that never gets boring, Busch says. 

Pulse Performance uses 3D body scans so members can track their progress and stay motivated. “We have regular consultations to review the scans so members can see results and make any necessary changes to their workout,” says Busch.

Pulse Performance uses 3D body scans so members can track their progress and stay motivated.

Does EMS Technology Really Work?

Getting fit by working out for only 20 minutes twice a week may seem too good to be true, but EMS technology has been a go-to workout for people worldwide who want an extra edge or seek recovery. Olympic athletes like Usain Bolt and supermodels have used EMS technology to up their games. EMS technology has been used to help athletic performance and build strength, stamina, coordination, and flexibility. Scientific American reports that EMS devices allow you to engage in deep, intense, and complete muscular contractions without activating (or stressing) your central nervous system, joints or tendons.

Delivered through a special EMS fitness suit, EMS technology sends impulses to muscles, helping them contract more times than a conventional workout will allow – without straining joints. The technology delivers a more effective workout with less impact and in less time. “Our members love the workout because it’s simple and offers all the benefits of a two-hour high-intensity workout session in just 20 minutes,” says Busch.

The Pulse Performance Franchise Opportunity

The Pulse Performance franchise offers a proven system for investors interested in getting in on the ground floor of a unique concept in a rapidly-growing industry. The business model offers a turn-key, membership-based business with multiple revenue streams, training and support.

Pulse Performance is currently accepting applications for franchise ownership. For additional information on the Pulse Performance franchising opportunity, visit PulsePerformanceFranchising.com.

Please note that before starting any new fitness regimen, you should consult your doctor. Although EMS training is generally safe for most, there are a few contraindications that will prohibit you from participating in an EMS session.

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Jill Abrahamsen’s career spans more than 20 years in editorial, design, and marketing roles. She serves as editor-in-chief of Franchise Consultant Magazine and FranchiseWire. Through both platforms, Jill reports on industry news and helps Franchisors spread the word about their brands.
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